News

With a growing number of elected officials and regulators expressing concerns about the jobs-related effects of the proposed T-Mobile/Sprint merger, T-Mobile executives are clearly feeling the heat and starting to worry. How else to explain their ramped-up attempts to attack CWA’s credibility on jobs?
It’s been a rough week for backers of the proposed T-Mobile/Sprint merger. Below are five reasons and reminders why.
During today’s U.S. House Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Communications and Technology hearing on the T-Mobile/Sprint merger, witnesses raising concerns about the proposed merger offered detailed and extensive documentation and analysis, while merger supporters relied on vague and unsubstantiated claims.
CWA DISTRICT 9 FILES NEW TESTIMONY TO CPUC SHOWING 3,342 CALIFORNIA JOBS AT RISK WITH PROPOSED MERGER. CONSUMERS WOULD FACE HIGHER PRICES, ESPECIALLY LOW-AND-MODERATE INCOME CALIFORNIANS.
The Communications Workers of America District 1 filed new comments with the New York Public Service Commission calling on the Commission to deny the joint petition of T-Mobile and Sprint to merge and supplementing earlier comments submitted by CWA District 1 in November 2018.
A new report finds that reducing the number of wireless carriers from four to three would lessen competition and reduce retail wireless workers’ wages.
A diverse array of concerned companies, consumer organizations, labor unions, and industry associations today announced the formation of the 4Competition Coalition, a new alliance to tell policymakers that the Sprint/T-Mobile merger as currently proposed must be blocked.
A new article provides more disturbing reminders how the proposed T-Mobile/Sprint merger could result in the closure of thousands of retail stores and the elimination of 30,000 jobs nationwide.
The Communications Workers of America (CWA) filed comments to the FCC analyzing the November econometric study submitted by Cornerstone Research on behalf of T-Mobile and Sprint's proposed merger.
The Communications Workers of America's November 28th presentation to the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) about the proposed T-Mobile/Sprint merger refutes the companies' justifications for the merger and details the overwhelming evidence demonstrating that the merger should be rejected as currently constructed.